Passchendaele: fighting for Belgium

Alles over Wereldoorlog 1 in België.

Moderators: Messalina, Tandorini

Passchendaele: fighting for Belgium

Berichtdoor Tandorini » 01 aug 2012, 20:56

Since 1917 Passchendaele has been a byword for the horror of the Great War. The name conjures images of a shattered landscape of mud, shell craters and barbed wire, and of helpless soldiers mown down by machine-guns and artillery. The capture of the Belgian village of Passchendaele (Passendale), near Ypres (Ieper) in Flanders, became an objective that cost the lives of thousands of people, including many New Zealanders. The ridge leading to the village was the site of the worst disaster, in terms of lives lost, in New Zealand’s history since 1840.

For the New Zealand Division, part of II Anzac Corps, major operations in Belgium began in June 1917 with the capture of Messines (Mesen) ridge. The battle for Passchendaele reached a climax in early October when a successful assault on Gravenstafel (Graventafel) Spur on the 4th was followed by a devastating defeat at Bellevue Spur on the 12th.

Even then, the misery was not over – in December, at nearby Polderhoek (Poelzelhoek), the New Zealanders suffered another costly setback. By the time they were finally withdrawn from the Ypres front line in February 1918, the New Zealand Division had suffered more than 18,000 casualties – including around 5000 deaths – and won three Victoria Crosses for bravery.

Verder lezen:

NEC JACTANTIA NEC METU ("zonder woorden, zonder vrees")

Avatar:De Siciliaanse vlag,oorspronkelijk uit 1282,de triskelion (trinacria) in het midden,is van oorsprong een oud Keltisch zonnesymbool.


Avatar gebruiker
Tandorini
Generaal
Generaal
 
Berichten: 2759
Geregistreerd: 30 mei 2008, 23:18

Re: Passchendaele: fighting for Belgium

Berichtdoor Tandorini » 04 aug 2012, 15:38

Passchendaele: The German Experience

Extracted from The German Army at Passchendaele by Jack Sheldon and reproduced by permission of Pen and Sword Books.
The Battle for Passchendaele involved the use of no less than eighty-six German divisions, twenty-two of them being pushed into the battle more than once. This compares to the fifty-one that Britain and her Dominions employed – though it must be taken into account that the Germans were approximately a third smaller in numbers of bayonets than the British, i.e. they had three fewer infantry battalions; even then, the British total approximates to about seventy German divisions.
It does mean, however, that the vast majority of the British army on the Western Front experienced the horrors of the Passchendaele battle – more so by some seven divisions than those who suffered in the longer (by about five weeks) and bloodier (by about 190,000 casualties) Somme offensive.
From the spring of 1915 the Germans steadily reduced their regiments to three battalions instead of four, a process which the British undertook in 1918. In October 1917 German battalions had bayonet strengths of about 800. There were four companies in each battalion, but they were numbered throughout the regiment from 1 to 12. The theory was that a regiment was commanded by a Colonel (Oberst) with a Lieutenant-Colonel as second in command, a battalion by a Major and a company by a Captain. In practice a regiment was usually being commanded by a Major, a battalion by a Captain and a company by a Lieutenant. NCOs carried out many of the functions of British junior officers; an Unteroffizier, whom many people think was an officer cadet, was not an officer, but rather a Corporal.


Verder lezen
Passchendaele, The German Experience
NEC JACTANTIA NEC METU ("zonder woorden, zonder vrees")

Avatar:De Siciliaanse vlag,oorspronkelijk uit 1282,de triskelion (trinacria) in het midden,is van oorsprong een oud Keltisch zonnesymbool.


Avatar gebruiker
Tandorini
Generaal
Generaal
 
Berichten: 2759
Geregistreerd: 30 mei 2008, 23:18


Keer terug naar Wereldoorlog 1 in België.

Wie is er online

Gebruikers op dit forum: Geen geregistreerde gebruikers. en 2 gasten

cron